Page 13 - 2013MagFINAL for web 7-14-14

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STEEPED IN
HISTORY
T
he Ozarks are a living tes-
tament to the past and the
people who came before us.
In clues left by Native
Americans, chroni-
cles of early explora-
tion, bloody battles
and infamous folk
heroes—plus some
pretty tall tales—”the
Ozark Trail travels
through time.
Take a side
trip through
this rich
heritage.
A mythical beast portrayed with a dragon’s head and tail and a
winged body like a giant armadillo,
the Karkaghne has a namesake
section on the Ozark Trail. Al-
ternatively, the Karkaghne has
been compared to the Pacific
Northwest’s Sasquatch: a
hairy 8-foot, man-like creature
occasionally glimpsed slipping
between Ozark trees.
With a bear-sized shaggy body, thick legs and
prominent horns, this fierce creature is said to live
in remote areas in Missouri. Its cry is described as a
combination of a wolf’s howl and the
bugle of an elk. If you see glowing
eyes and feel a sense of menace
deep in the Ozark woods, it could
be the Howler on the prowl.
NATIVE AMERICAN
TRAIL TREES
Hardwoods believed to have been
bent as saplings by Native Americans
to mark a path or the location of a
cave or other resource. They show a
characteristic curve near the ground
and often bear evidence of the bind-
ing that shaped them. A possible trail
tree is located near Nazarenko Spring
on the Trace Creek section of the trail.
OZARK BLACK
HOWLER
Sources:
History.com. “Trail of Tears”:
http://www.history.com/topics/native-american-history/trail-of-tears
;
Missouri Civil War Heritage Foundation:
http://www.mocivilwar.org
; Morrow, Lynn. “The Yocum Silver
Dollar.” White River Valley Historical Quarterly. Vol. 8, No. 11, Spring 1985; History Department, Missouri
State University. Henry R. Schoolcraft. Journal of a Tour into the Interior of Missouri and Arkansaw:
http://
clio.missouristate.edu/FTMiller/LocalHistory/Schoolcraft/schcrftcomplete.htm
; The State Historical Society of
Missouri. “Historic Missourians: Jesse Woodson James”:
http://shs.umsystem.edu/historicmissourians/name/j/
jamesj/
; Wells, Don and Diane Wells. Mystery of the Trees: Native American Markers of a Cultural Way of Life
that Soon May Be Gone. Jasper, Georgia: Mountain Stewards Publishing Company, 2011; Across The Ozarks.
The Ozark Howler – Legend or Fact?:
http://acrosstheozarks.com/2013/07/25/the-ozark-howler-legend-or-fact/
LEGEND
A notorious Missouri outlaw,
James was born in Clay County
MO in 1847. The
James Gang robbed a
bank in Ste. Genevieve
and pulled off train
robberies in Gad’s Hill
and Glendale, among
crimes in many towns.
Between sprees,
James was rumored to have hidden
out in Meramec Caverns
near Stanton.
JESSE JAMES
As a border state, Missouri was bitterly
contested in the Civil War. With over 1,100
military engagements, the state was consid-
ered strategic for
its lead and iron
resources. Divided
loyalties led to rival
state governments
during the war
and brutal guerilla warfare that continued
long afterward.
Image: the Battle of
Wilson’s Creek, August 1861, paint-
ing by Andrew Wyeth in MO
capitol rotunda.
THE CIVIL WAR
IN MISSOURI
The Indian Removal Act
of 1830 evicted Native Americans
from their ancestral homes in the
southeastern U.S.
to Oklahoma. The
Northern Route,
traveled by the
Cherokee in 1838,
crossed into Missouri near Cape Girardeau and
passed the northernmost Courtois section
of the Ozark Trail near Onondaga Cave.
More than 5,000 died of starvation,
cold and violence during
the trip.
THE TRAIL OF TEARS
In 1815, the Yocum (or “Yoa-
chum”) family settled near the White
and James Rivers. Legend says
they gained rights to a fabulous
cave with a secret entrance on
Breadtray Mountain and walls
“lined with silver.” They minted
their own pure silver coins which were
used as local currency. The mine’s
location has remained a mystery.
Image: coin struck with die
used to create the original
Yocum Dollars.
THE YOCUM
SILVER DOLLAR
Battle of
Fredericktown
Train robbery in 1874
Gad’s Hill
James Gang hide-out in
Meramec Caverns,
Stanton
Train robbery in 1870
Glendale
Bank robbery in 1873
Ste. Genevieve
Battle of
Clark’s
Mill
Battle of
Hartville
BREADTRAY
MOUNTAIN
KARKAGHNE
&
WANT TO KNOW MORE?
For additional information about Schoolcraft’s travels and the Trail of Tears in MO, see
ozarktrail.co
m
/magazines/connector-2013-WebExtras.html
Battle of
Cape Girardeau
In November 1818, Henry
Rowe Schoolcraft and Levi
Pettibone embarked from
Potosi MO on a 900-mile
round trip to the White River
to explore possible commer-
cial resources. Schoolcraft wrote the first
published accounts of the Ozarks region
with details that suggest his expedi-
tion crossed or paralleled today’s
Ozark Trail in multiple
locations.
LEWIS AND CLARK
OF THE OZARKS
Civil War Battle Sites
Jesse James Historical Sites
Trail of Tears Northern Route
Schoolcraft Route
Ozark Trail
Battle of
Pilot Knob
Battle of
Wilson’s
Creek
The Ozark Trail Association
ozark
trail.
com
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